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Mario Molina

Mario Molina was a Mexican-American chemist who is best known for his work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly his research on the depletion of the ozone layer. He was born on March 19, 1943, in Mexico City, Mexico, and passed away on October 7, 2020.


Molina earned a Bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1965, and then went on to earn a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1972. He conducted research at various institutions, including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he was a professor of atmospheric chemistry.




In 1995, Molina was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland, for their work on the depletion of the ozone layer. Their research showed that certain chemicals, particularly chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), were contributing to the destruction of the ozone layer, which protects the Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation.


Molina was a strong advocate for environmental protection and played an active role in shaping policy related to climate change and ozone depletion. He served on numerous scientific advisory committees and was a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.


Mario Molina's legacy lives on through his groundbreaking research and his efforts to raise awareness about the importance of protecting the environment. 


Mario Molina Family

Mario Molina was born on March 19, 1943, in Mexico City, Mexico. He was the son of Roberto Molina Pasquel and Leonor HenrĂ­quez de Molina. His father was a lawyer, and his mother was a homemaker.


Mario Molina was married to his wife, Luisa Tan Molina, for over 40 years until his death in 2020. They had two children together, Andrea and Felipe Molina. Andrea Molina is a psychologist and Felipe Molina is an environmental scientist like his father.


Mario Molina's siblings include Enrique Molina, who is a physicist, and Federico Molina, who is an engineer.


Mario Molina Education 

Molina earned his undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1965. He then moved to the United States and received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1972.


After completing his Ph.D., Molina conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California, Irvine, where he began his work on the environmental impacts of human activity. He then joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, as a research scientist.


In 1982, Molina and his colleague, F. Sherwood Rowland, published a groundbreaking paper in the journal Nature, in which they first proposed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could deplete the ozone layer. This discovery led to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, an international treaty that phased out the production and use of CFCs.


Molina was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995, along with Rowland and Paul Crutzen, for their work on the ozone layer. He was the first Mexican-born citizen to win a Nobel Prize in science.


Throughout his career, Molina was an advocate for science education and public policy that addresses environmental issues. He held academic positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and the University of California, Berkeley, and he founded the Mario Molina Center for Energy and Environment in Mexico City in 2004.


Mario Molina Career

He was best known for his research on the effects of man-made chemicals on the Earth's ozone layer, which earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995.


Molina received his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 1965 and went on to obtain his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1972. After completing his doctoral studies, he joined the faculty at the University of California, Irvine, where he worked until his retirement in 2004.


In the early 1970s, Molina began researching the effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the Earth's ozone layer. He and his research partner, Sherwood Rowland, discovered that CFCs were depleting the ozone layer and increasing the risk of skin cancer, cataracts, and other health problems. Their work helped lead to the signing of the Montreal Protocol, an international agreement to phase out the production of CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances.


Throughout his career, Molina also served as a scientific advisor to various organizations, including the United Nations, the World Health Organization, and the U.S. government. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and received numerous awards for his contributions to science and the environment.


Mario Molina

Mario Molina was a renowned Mexican chemist who was known for his work on ozone depletion. He received numerous awards and honors throughout his career, including:


Nobel Prize in Chemistry: In 1995, Molina, along with F. Sherwood Rowland and Paul Crutzen, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone.


Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement: Molina received this prestigious award in 1983 for his groundbreaking work on the chemistry of the ozone layer.


Presidential Medal of Freedom: In 2013, Molina was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor in the United States, for his work in advancing the understanding of the ozone layer and its depletion.


Blue Planet Prize: Molina was awarded the Blue Planet Prize in 1997, an environmental award that recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the sustainable development of the world.


National Medal of Science: Molina received this award in 1999 for his work on atmospheric chemistry and the protection of the ozone layer.


Prince of Asturias Award: In 2003, Molina was awarded the Prince of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research, one of the most prestigious awards in Spain.


American Chemical Society Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology: Molina received this award in 1993 for his work on atmospheric chemistry and the ozone layer.


United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Global 500 Roll of Honour: In 1993, Molina was named to the UNEP Global 500 Roll of Honour, which recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the protection of the environment.


American Geophysical Union (AGU) Roger Revelle Medal: Molina was awarded the AGU Roger Revelle Medal in 1996 for his work on the chemistry of the atmosphere.


Albert Einstein World Award of Science: In 1997, Molina was awarded the Albert Einstein World Award of Science, which recognizes outstanding achievements in science and technology that have contributed to the benefit of humanity.


International Ozone Commission Quadrennial Ozone Award: Molina received this award in 2004 for his work on the depletion of the ozone layer and the Montreal Protocol.


BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award: Molina was awarded this prestigious award in 2010 for his work on the chemistry of the atmosphere and the protection of the ozone layer.


Mario Molina was born in Mexico City in 1943 and earned his Bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 1965. He went on to earn his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1972.


In the early 1970s, Molina and his colleague F. Sherwood Rowland began researching the impact of human-made chemicals, particularly chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), on the ozone layer. Their research showed that CFCs could break down ozone molecules in the stratosphere, leading to a depletion of the ozone layer.


Molina's work on ozone depletion led to the adoption of the Montreal Protocol in 1987, an international agreement to phase out the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. The protocol is widely considered to be one of the most successful international environmental agreements.


In addition to his research on the ozone layer, Molina was also involved in research on air pollution and climate change. He was a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.


Molina was also an advocate for science education and outreach. He co-founded the Mario Molina Center for Energy and Environment, which promotes sustainable development and environmental education in Mexico and other Latin American countries.


Mario Molina passed away on October 7, 2020, at the age of 77. His legacy as a pioneering environmental scientist and advocate for sustainability continues to inspire scientists and policymakers around the world.


Mario Molina was not only a renowned scientist, but also an advocate for science-based policy making. He often spoke out about the importance of scientific research and the need for policymakers to use scientific evidence to guide their decisions.


In addition to his research on atmospheric chemistry and the ozone layer, Molina was also involved in research on the health impacts of air pollution. He was a co-author of a study that linked air pollution to a range of health problems, including heart disease and stroke.


Molina was a member of the United Nations Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board and served on a number of other international scientific panels and advisory groups.


Molina's work on the ozone layer and the Montreal Protocol has been credited with helping to save the ozone layer and prevent a catastrophic increase in skin cancer and other health problems. According to some estimates, the protocol has prevented up to two million cases of skin cancer per year.


Molina's legacy continues to inspire young scientists around the world. In 2020, the Mario Molina Fellowship Program was established to provide funding for early-career scientists working on issues related to climate change and sustainability.


Mario Molina's contributions to science and environmental policy have been recognized by numerous organizations and institutions around the world. In addition to the awards listed earlier, he was also a recipient of the American Physical Society's Leo Szilard Lectureship Award, the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal, and the United Nations Environmental Programme Sasakawa Environment Prize.


Molina Mario Thoughts

Mario Molina was a Mexican chemist who made significant contributions to the field of atmospheric chemistry, particularly in his work on the depletion of the ozone layer. He shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995 for his research on the formation and decomposition of ozone in the atmosphere.


Molina was a passionate advocate for the protection of the environment and the mitigation of climate change. He believed that it was the responsibility of scientists to not only conduct research but also communicate their findings to policymakers and the public. He worked tirelessly to raise awareness about the impact of human activities on the environment and to encourage action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


Molina also emphasized the importance of international cooperation and collaboration in addressing environmental challenges. He was a strong supporter of the Montreal Protocol, an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer, and he played a key role in the negotiation of the agreement.


Overall, Molina was a brilliant scientist and a dedicated environmentalist who used his expertise to help protect the planet and improve the lives of people around the world. His legacy continues to inspire new generations of scientists and activists to work towards a more sustainable future.


Mario Molina Achievements


Mario Molina was a Mexican chemist who made significant contributions to the understanding of the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere. Here are some of his most notable achievements:-


Discovery of the Ozone Hole: In the early 1970s, Molina and his colleague F. Sherwood Rowland discovered that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy the Earth's ozone layer. This discovery led to the adoption of the Montreal Protocol, an international agreement that regulated the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances.


Nobel Prize in Chemistry: In 1995, Molina was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, along with Rowland and Paul Crutzen, for their work on the chemistry of the ozone layer.





Environmental Activism: Molina was a passionate environmental activist and advocate for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. He served on various scientific committees and advisory boards, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).


Academic Career: Molina was a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego, and also held positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of California, Berkeley.


Awards and Honors: In addition to the Nobel Prize, Molina received numerous other awards and honors throughout his career, including the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the Albert Einstein World Award of Science.


Mario Molina's contributions to our understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and his advocacy for environmental protection continue to inspire scientists and policymakers around the world.

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